Posts Tagged ‘New Releases’

Killing Town In Stores Now

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Hardcover:
E-Book:

Killing Town, the lost first Mike Hammer novel, is in stores now!

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Mike Hammer steals a ride on a train upstate to Killington. But he is welcomed by a nasty surprise: he is accused by police of raping and murdering a young woman near the freight yards. Roughed up by the cops and facing a murder charge, Hammer’s future looks bleak. Only a beautiful blonde, Melba Charles—daughter of powerful Senator Charles—might possibly save him… if he pays the price.

But why would Melba help save a man she has never met? And, more to the point, where is the real murderer?

From a brittle, brown manuscript, the first Mike Hammer novel—begun by Mickey Spillane in the mid-forties and completed seventy years later by Max Allan Collins—is a gift to mystery fans on the occasion of the noir master’s 100th birthday.

Bloody Book Giveaway!

Tuesday, February 6th, 2018
The Bloody Spur
Hardcover:
E-Book: Google Play Kobo

The Bloody Spur, third in the Caleb York series, is now available.

All copies have been given away. Thank you for your support!

To celebrate, I am offering free copies to the first seven of you who write me at [REDACTED], on assurance you will review it at Amazon and/or Barnes and Noble (blogs also welcome). You must be in the United States (no Canada or overseas), and you must include your snail mail address.

The production in Clearwater, Florida, of Encore for Murder (which concluded its run Feb. 3) kicked off the Spillane centenary. Here’s a rundown on everything else (up to now):

The Bloody Spur (A Caleb York Western) Out now!
by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Kensington hardcover.

The Will to Kill (Mike Hammer), February 27, 2018 by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Hard Case Crime mass market paperback.

The Mike Hammer Collection, Volume IV, Mar 6, 2018 by Mickey Spillane introduced by Max Allan Collins (Mickey’s final four Mike Hammer novels) Possibly e-book only.

The Last Stand March 20, 2018 by Mickey Spillane (Spillane’s final solo novel with Max Allan Collins intro & co-written novella, “A Bullet for Satisfaction”). Hard Case Crime hardcover.

Killing Town (Mike Hammer), April 17, 2018 by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Titan hardcover.

Playboy April 2018, “Killing Town” by Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins,” excerpt from novel.

Articles in Publisher’s Weekly, Mystery Scene, Crimespree, and the Wall Street Journal.

New Spillane/Collins short story, “The Big Run,” to be announced. Based on an unproduced 1954 teleplay by Spillane.

Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer: The Night I Died comic book, in four issues followed by graphic novel collection, debuts Fall 2018, written by Max Allan Collins from Spillane/Collins story.

I have also done as second draft of the follow-up play to Encore for Murder – Mike Hammer: The Little Death, which is likely to be produced in Clearwater in the Fall of ‘18. It uses the same source material as the graphic novel above.

Other work this week included doing the galleys for Killing Town and writing a proposal/sample chapter for a Spillane critical bio by James Traylor and me.

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Here’s a preview of Quarry’s War #3. Releases this Wednesday!

M.A.C.

Quarry New Year!

Tuesday, January 2nd, 2018

This has been a significant year for Quarry. Though his series on Cinemax ran only one season, it was well-received, even acclaimed, and a very good, interesting take on an origin story for the character.

I am very pleased with the Quarry comic book (actually serialized graphic novel), Quarry’s War, the second issue of which is out this week with two variant covers. I have a new artist, Edu Menna, who I think does a fine job. In fact, I would rate this single issue among the best comic books ever to bear my name.

Here’s a preview of both covers and the first few pages.

Additionally, for those of you who are into audio books, Stefan Rudnicki does a great job narrating Quarry’s Climax. His voice is gruffly rich and quietly wry. He really “gets” Quarry, and as publisher of Skyboat Media, he’s one of the great friends of this series. Get it here (or directly from Audible).

Quarry also makes an appearance in Otto Penzler’s The Big Book of Rogues and Villains. Here’s a review.

This has been a year of incredible highs and a few lows. Quarry on Cinemax was a real treat, and I am particularly proud and humbled (well, not that humble) to be a Mystery Writers of America “Grand Master.” My wife Barb assures me that even though 2017 is over, I am still a Grand Master. She also doesn’t seem terribly impressed about it….

Thanks for all your support – buying the books, cheering me on in my medical adventures, writing comments here…all appreciated.

Finally, Bill Crider – we love you!

M.A.C.

Road to Paradise Just Published

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

The new Brash Books edition of Road to Paradise is out, and if you’re a fan of the trilogy – particularly if you’ve never read my complete version of the Road to Perdition movie novel – I hope you’ll support me and Brash in this fine effort, and buy all three. Brash did a lovely job packaging the books, which look very nice on a shelf together.

Some readers seem flummoxed by the O’Sullivan saga. It starts as a graphic novel (Road to Perdition), becomes a movie of that novel generating a novelization of the screenplay (with me doing a novel based on a screenplay based on my graphic novel), followed by a sort of prequel graphic novel (Road to Perdition 2: On the Road) published in three parts and then collected, with two prose sequels (Road to Purgatory and Road to Paradise) and a final graphic novel (Return to Perdition) rounding things out.

Even I’m confused.

How did all that happen? Well, when the movie came along I did not want to see a novelization written by anyone but me. Since at the time I was doing a lot of movie and TV tie-in work, I felt it would be an embarrassment to have someone else do it. I did not predict that my novel would be butchered (and that I would have to do the butchering myself), nor did I predict that many years later a publisher would come along (Brash) to navigate the rocky waters of freeing up novelization rights to a big-budget Hollywood film so that my full version could finally be published.

The weekend Road to Perdition opened and was a hit, I rolled into action (or that is, my agent rolled into action). I was ready with the idea to do the two prose sequels, knowing that my artist – the wonderful Richard Piers Rayner – could not produce graphic novel sequels in a timely enough fashion to take advantage of the moment. But I also knew there was an appetite from publishers for more Road to Perdition in comics form, and indeed both Marvel and DC came looking. Richard was enlisted for the covers (that sort of fell through, an editorial decision I did not control) and several other terrific artists came on board to get Road to Perdition 2 out there quickly.

The coda to the series, Return to Perdition, with my longtime collaborator Terry Beatty coming on board, would have been a prose novel if the publishers of Purgatory and Paradise has been interested – they weren’t, but DC was. So we ended as we began, as a graphic novel.

I do view the graphic novel material as one thing – three graphic novels – and the novels as something else – a prose trilogy. That they fit together is more a bonus than a necessity. The prose trilogy works fine on its own.

That torturous tale – as dull a one as I have ever told – ultimately adds up to my gratitude to Brash Books for bringing the prose trilogy out in a lovely, uniform editions, with special thanks for rescuing the Perdition prose novel from tie-in oblivion.

Road to Paradise was an especially difficult one to put together, making me flex narrative muscles – characterization depths – that I hadn’t before or since. I think of it as a kind of deadpan tragedy, with some blood-spattered redemption by journey’s end.

Again, you won’t be sorry if you add these to your Max Allan Collins shelf (something each and every American should have!).

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The question I am most often asked – well, the question I’m most often asked is, “Has anyone ever told you that you look like Elton John?” – but the next-most-asked-question is, “What do you read?”

I’ve often said that I read little contemporary fiction, and almost no crime or mystery fiction beyond the people I learned from – Hammett, Chandler, Spillane, Cain, Thompson, Stout, Christie, Gardner, etc. What I do read is non-fiction. Right now I am plowing thorough sixteen books related to the Sam Sheppard case for the Heller I’m about to write.

But I find time, here and there – in doctor’s offices and on the can or in the tub (not a pretty thought, but a reality) to read a good deal of non-fiction. Here are some books I’ve enjoyed of late.

Mr. Novak: An Acclaimed Television Series by Chuck Harter is one of the best books that Bear Manor Media has published. Bear Manor Media puts out pop culture titles no one else would, and are to be commended for it, although only a handful display real excellence, like A Maverick Life: The Jack Kelly Story by Linda Alexander, The Matchless Gene Rayburn by Adam Nedeff, and Sandra Grabman’s forthcoming Petrocelli: San Remo Justice, for which I wrote the introduction.

Though Mr. Novak was my favorite TV series during my high school days, it had slipped from my memory somewhat due to the lack of a second-run life of reruns (but for a brief time on TNT). Possibly because it ran only two seasons (although racking up 60 episodes), Mr. Novak never got into syndication. A few years ago I bought a few gray market DVDs with Novak episodes, and found it as compelling now as I had in high school.

The 1963 – 1965 series was a sideways imitation of the then very popular Dr. Kildare, with Richard Chamberlin’s young doctor and Raymond Massey’s wise mentor setting the pattern for James Francisus as idealistic English teacher John Novak and Dean Jagger as the principal who helped him along. The series was generally very well written by (among others) producer/creator E. Jack Neuman, John D.F. Black and Meyer Dolinksy, directed by such luminaries as Richard Donner, Paul Wendkos, and Ida Lupino, with many top actors, including young ones like Beau Bridges, Kim Darby, Terri Garr and in particular Walter Koenig, starring in three episodes (once as a Russian exchange student!), just one of many future Star Trek talents who turn up in front of and behind the camera. The series was earnest, usually intelligent and explored many topics of the day, a surprising number of which still pertain.

Author Harter has gathered every scrap of information about the show imaginable, and the book’s major fault is its cut-and-paste nature, as many articles (including PR flackery) appear in wholesale fashion. But he makes up for it by more contemporary interview excerpts from many actors and creative personnel from the series, for which he provides a smart, lively episode guide. And pictures. Wonderful, wonderful pictures.

I am in particular a fan of Franciscus, who had a fine career and almost broke through as a major film star. But Novak was his signature role, and his dedication to it and the series he helmed came through strong in his performances, which still have a modern, Method-ish feel, despite his hunky good looks. Jagger is predictably excellent, but health concerns and apparently some creative issues – not the least of which was the second season’s impending cancellation – found him exiting early, with an equally compelling Burgess Meredith stepping in as a somewhat unpopular teacher elevated to the principal position.

Harter, for all his love for the series and diligence in telling its story, misses a few steps. He does not mention that Franciscus had a resemblance to John F. Kennedy (he would later play him in the film The Greek Tycoon) that led to a special episode about the death of a teacher. Nor did he notice the in-jokey, unbilled appearance in one episode by Suzanne Pleshette, Franciscus’ co-star in the film Youngblood Hawke (from the Herman Wouk novel).

A DVD release of the first (and superior season) is on the horizon from Warner Archives.

Other books I’ve enjoyed of late include Wayne and Ford: The Films, the Friendship, and the Forging of an American Hero by Nancy Schoenberger, a well-done combination of dual biography and critical film study; You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet: Interviews with Stars from Hollywood’s Golden Era by James Bawden and Ron Miller, an interesting follow-up to their Conversations with Classic Film Stars; and From Holmes to Sherlock: the Story of the Men and Women Who Created an Icon by Mattias Bostrom, a fascinating treatment of Doyle’s creation of Holmes and the way in which it became such a popular culture juggernaut, sometimes in spite of Doyle’s descendants.

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Here’s a fun write-up on the best five Logan Marshall-Green bad-ass performances (guess what the top pick is).

Here’s info about the magazine Back Issue #101, devoted to rock ‘n’ roll in comics, featuring a nice article on my band, Seduction of the Innocent.

This terrific look at Quarry concentrates on the most recent novel and the very first one. Don’t miss this.

M.A.C.