Posts Tagged ‘The Little Death’

Bloody Book Giveaway!

Tuesday, February 6th, 2018
The Bloody Spur
Hardcover:
E-Book: Google Play Kobo

The Bloody Spur, third in the Caleb York series, is now available.

All copies have been given away. Thank you for your support!

To celebrate, I am offering free copies to the first seven of you who write me at [REDACTED], on assurance you will review it at Amazon and/or Barnes and Noble (blogs also welcome). You must be in the United States (no Canada or overseas), and you must include your snail mail address.

The production in Clearwater, Florida, of Encore for Murder (which concluded its run Feb. 3) kicked off the Spillane centenary. Here’s a rundown on everything else (up to now):

The Bloody Spur (A Caleb York Western) Out now!
by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Kensington hardcover.

The Will to Kill (Mike Hammer), February 27, 2018 by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Hard Case Crime mass market paperback.

The Mike Hammer Collection, Volume IV, Mar 6, 2018 by Mickey Spillane introduced by Max Allan Collins (Mickey’s final four Mike Hammer novels) Possibly e-book only.

The Last Stand March 20, 2018 by Mickey Spillane (Spillane’s final solo novel with Max Allan Collins intro & co-written novella, “A Bullet for Satisfaction”). Hard Case Crime hardcover.

Killing Town (Mike Hammer), April 17, 2018 by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Titan hardcover.

Playboy April 2018, “Killing Town” by Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins,” excerpt from novel.

Articles in Publisher’s Weekly, Mystery Scene, Crimespree, and the Wall Street Journal.

New Spillane/Collins short story, “The Big Run,” to be announced. Based on an unproduced 1954 teleplay by Spillane.

Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer: The Night I Died comic book, in four issues followed by graphic novel collection, debuts Fall 2018, written by Max Allan Collins from Spillane/Collins story.

I have also done as second draft of the follow-up play to Encore for Murder – Mike Hammer: The Little Death, which is likely to be produced in Clearwater in the Fall of ‘18. It uses the same source material as the graphic novel above.

Other work this week included doing the galleys for Killing Town and writing a proposal/sample chapter for a Spillane critical bio by James Traylor and me.

* * *

Here’s a preview of Quarry’s War #3. Releases this Wednesday!

M.A.C.

Required Viewing List Part Two

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

Last week I came up with a list of my favorite sixteen movies, which got some interesting reaction. But that number was ungainly, so I’ve decided to bring it up to 25 Favorite movies with nine more.

Understand that I’m not listing my take on best movies. This is a personal list. Ed Gorman responded to mine in his blog, saying he liked my choices and then listed his. Every one of Ed’s favorites were films I like a lot, yet none were on my favorites list, which I define by how often I want to return to these films. A favorite film is a place you want to revisit, like a cottage on the lake or a restaurant that’s worth a fifty-mile drive.

Both Ed and I have been questioned because we have so few foreign films (he has one, DIABOLIQUE) on our lists, and also that so few films are included that were made in the last couple decades. Barb and I go to the movies just about every week, sometimes more than once – I don’t know anybody except Leonard Maltin who sees more movies than I do. But the films that resonate for me are Hollywood born, in the mid-20th Century. These films – like the books of Hammett, Chandler, Cain, and Spillane – influenced me. So I celebrate them here.

I also plan to follow up with a favorite director’s list. Many of my favorite films are not courtesy of my favorite directors – for example, the Randolph Scott westerns of Budd Boetticher are among my most loved films, but I view them as a body of work. Some of my most loved directors made the list last week – Hitchcock and Joseph H. Lewis, for example – but most did not.

By the way, I did not watch the Academy Awards this year. I almost never do (the year ROAD TO PERDITION was up for a bunch of Oscars was the last time). I watch a movie instead.

For now, here are the rest of my Top 25.

The Bad Seed

17. THE BAD SEED (1956). This should be no surprise to anyone, since my indie film MOMMY (1995) has been called an unofficial sequel, casting Patty McCormack as a grown-up variation on homicidal child Rhoda Penmark. The novel by William March and the play by Maxwell Anderson are both brilliant works, and director Mervyn Leroy’s faithful, gently opened up recreation of the Broadway hit captures all the black humor and dread of both. Leroy often gets criticized for the Hollywood ending, but there is a WIZARD OF OZ-like otherworldly tone to Rhoda walking in the thunder storm in her little raincoat, running her flashlight along a picket fence, on her way to once and for all retrieve the spelling medal (which made the “pen marks” on little Claude Daigle’s forehead and hands). The much criticized curtain call, with Nancy Kelly spanking Patty was actually part of the stage play, considered a necessary cooling off after the shock of the original (Rhoda surviving her mother’s efforts to kill her). Astonishingly, Nancy Kelly (sister of Bart Maverick, Jack Kelly) never had another movie role, despite her Academy Award nomination and a wonderfully melodramatic performance worthy of Bette Davis or Joan Crawford. The new Blu-ray reveals nuances in Patty’s performance that reveal her already understanding the difference between stage and film.

18. MARK OF ZORRO (1940). As a kid and even today I am a sucker for swashbuckling movies, and Tyrone Power was the 1940s king of those, the sound-era version of Douglas Fairbanks (literally in this remake). Johnston McCulley’s novel is faithfully followed in this, the greatest of all Zorro films, with perhaps the most exciting duel ever put on him as Power faces down evil Basil Rathbone, who could actually fence. Rouben Mamoulian directed this funny, sexy, exciting film with a rousing score by Alfred Newman. One to watch again and again.

19. POINT BLANK (1967). John Boorman’s spellbinding pop art, European-influenced take on the Richard Stark “Parker” novels transcends a spotty script to become one of the two most influential crime films of the ‘60s (BONNIE AND CLYDE is the other). Haunted zombie Lee Marvin walks through this dream-like neo-noir landscape (he’s named Walker, after all) exhibiting a quietly sociopathic intensity that makes this almost a horror film.

20. PRETTY POISON (1968). Another dream-like film, this one is heavily influenced by BONNIE AND CLYDE and plays off the Perkins PSYCHO persona as well. Yet it is strikingly original, funny, dark, and disturbing. Tuesday Weld is so fetching and sweetly evil that just about any heterosexual male would do for her the things Perkins does. Why director Noel Black did not enjoy a major career after this is a sad mystery.

21. DAMN YANKEES (1958). Another of that small handful of Broadway musicals brought faithfully to the screen, with stars Ray Walston (his signature performance, despite my wife referring to him as “My Little Martian”) and funny, sexy Gwen Verdon doing her famous “Whatever Lola Wants.” A great score from the PAJAMA GAME team of Richard Adler and Jerry Ross (Ross would tragically die young after these two great shows) provides the spine of this terrific Faust story in which a baseball fan learns that he actually loves his wife more than he does the Washington Senators. Tab Hunter is excellent here, despite critical carping, and Walston is just fantastic as Applegate (“I see cannibals a’munchin’, a missionary luncheon”). You go to the ball game. I’ll stay home and watch this.

22. RIO BRAVO (1959). John Wayne and Howard Hawks answer HIGH NOON in this classic western where the sheriff turns down help from the citizens. Dean Martin turns in his finest performance as the reformed drunk who becomes Wayne’s deputy, and Angie Dickinson makes a stunning impression in her first major film role. Even Ricky Nelson seems perfect. My son Nate (normally very perceptive) found this movie corny when I showed it to him a few years ago, in particular Walter Brennan’s trademark old geezer performance, but some day he will wise up.

23. DEVIL AND DANIEL WEBSTER (1941). Another dream-like film, and another Faust story. Director William Dieterle’s brilliant film, beautifully acted, is a Halloween favorite around the Collins household. The performance by Simone Simon as a ghostly seductress is mesmerizing – again, most men will understand why farmer James Craig casts lovely Anne Shirley aside for her. Craig’s trial in front of a jury of the damned (including the likes of Benedict Arnold and Captain Kidd) probably marks the high point of actor Edward Arnold’s distinguished career. And Walter Huston is as scary as he is hilarious as Mr. Scratch. Then there’s that Bernard Hermann score….

24. BEDAZZLED (1967). Did I mention I’m a fool for Faust films? Director Stanley Donen is most famous as a director of fifties musicals, but here he perfectly captures the mid- ‘60s in swinging London and along the way provides the only great screen representation of comedy team Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. If you’ve seen and enjoyed this, you have probably had moments when you’ve blown the raspberry much as Moore’s Stanley does, anxious to trade one reality for another. Each hilarious and dismal attempt by Stanley to come up with a future worth trading his soul for is topped by the next disaster. The score by Moore is a shimmering delight, in particular the pop star sequence, which proves as prescient as PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE.

25. THE PRODUCERS (1968). Do I really have to write anything about this one? How about, “I’m hysterical and I’m wet,” or Lee Meredith dancing for Max and Leo, or “Max, he’s wearing a dress,” or “I have said this is the short fuse, and this is the short fuse”? Let’s leave it at this – liking this movie is an example of smartness.

* * *

I’m pleased to report that THE NEW ADVENTURES OF MIKE HAMMER VOLUME 3: ENCORE FOR MURDER has been nominated for the Audie in the Best Original Work category. We won last year with THE LITTLE DEATH. This is the full-cast radio “novel” with Stacy Keach and a full cast (including the last major performance by my late friend and collaborator, Mike Cornelison).

More nice things are being said about the new Paul Cain book that Lynn Myers and I edited. I haven’t got my copy yet, but you can check out the info here.

And here’s a nice ANGEL IN BLACK review.

Finally, here’s a way to pick up the unedited, complete versions of my Dreadtime Stories, REINCARNAL and WOLF, full-cast presentations. More to come: A GOOD HEAD ON HIS SHOULDERS and MERCY are in the pipeline. MERCY is a new story (the others are adapted from previously published work of mine).

M.A.C.

San Diego Dispatches

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011
2011 Audie Award

That’s me in this week’s pic fondling my Audie award, taken in my basement book room. Very proud of this one (for THE NEW ADVENTURES OF MIKE HAMMER: THE LITTLE DEATH). The crystal award is actually a very beautiful object. Thanks to producer Carl Amari (TWILIGHT ZONE radio series) for the great opportunity.

This will be a short update, but I will be posting on a daily basis from the San Diego Comic-con – expect the first missive to appear Thursday morning July 21 and every day thereafter through July 25. Look for pictures of celebrities who are, I hope, bigger deals than the one depicted with this posting.

Not long ago I went in to Chicago to meet with sports radio legend Mike North – a great guy, as smart as he is funny (which is pretty damn smart) – to continue exploring a movie project on his life, which is sort of Horatio Alger Chicago-style, from hot dog vendor to radio superstar. Sun-Times columnist Bill Zwecker covered it in his column, but you’ll have to scroll down past the GLEE stuff.

One of the fun things about the Internet is the occasional quirky, personal review of a book that turns up, very much not in the vein of traditional criticism. Check out this fun look at STRIP FOR MURDER from a reviewer who objects to my anti-anti-Communism – he prefers Joe McCarthy to Ed Murrow! Lots of discussion of Al Capp and Ham Fisher here.

And I liked this review of THE LAST QUARRY a lot – another quirky, personal but smart review.

We’ll close out with three more reviews of the Criterion Collection Blu-ray/DVD of KISS ME DEADLY, all of which mention my documentary MIKE HAMMER’S MICKEY SPILLANE.

Also, there’s a Criterion 50% off sale at Barnes & Noble, both the web site and the stores, and it’s a cheap way to pick up the greatest Mike Hammer movie of all time.

M.A.C.

Hammer Grand Slammer

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

This news came in shortly after the last update was posted, so you may be aware of this – it got lots of play on the net – but my radio-style audio novel, THE NEW ADVENTURES OF MIKE HAMMER: THE LITTLE DEATH (starring Stacy Keach), won the Audie for Best Original Work. The Audies are the Academy Awards of the audiobook world, so this is a big deal. Blackstone Audio posted their congratulations here.

And if you haven’t listened to THE LITTLE DEATH – or its (I feel) even better follow-up, ENCORE FOR MURDER – you are missing out. Whether a Spillane buff or M.A.C. fan (or both), you will have a great time.

Kiss Her Goodbye

Also, Stacy Keach’s reading of KISS HER GOODBYE has just been released, with a different cover than the hardcover novel. We are listening to it now, and Stacy is just great. Any writer benefits when Mr. Keach is making them look good.

Another great piece of news comes with a rave review from Dick Lochte for KISS HER GOODBYE on the front page of the LA Times Calendar section. This stunning review has been picked up all over the net, and should give the book a very nice boost.

Also exciting is having January magazine single out KISS HER GOODBYE as one of Pierce’s picks of the week. But especially cool is the cyber zine singling out Pierce’s choice and the book for a front-page rave. Check it out.

J. Kingston Pierce’s new weekly pick has already been posted, but here is last week’s pick (KISS HER GOODBYE) for your reading pleasure.

The KISS HER GOODBYE raves just keep coming. Here the terrific site Singular Points makes some singular points about the book.

The same site has a very nice write-up about meeting Mickey Spillane some years ago.

Yet another great KISS HER GOODBYE review.

And courtesy of Jeff Pierce, this time at his Kirkus mystery-reviewing blog, comes the very first advance review of BYE BYE, BABYand it’s glowing (something that hasn’t exactly always happened to me with Kirkus reviews).

Some advance love for BYE BYE, BABY is viewable at another site, as well.

And this unexpected valentine to my first series character – in fact, first novel – comes from Paul Bishop (cop, writer, TV personality, handsome devil, talented, too…why don’t I hate him?) who made BAIT MONEY his “Forgotten Book” of the week, which is a compliment…trust me.

Another first-rate writer, Mel Odom, read Paul’s write-up and waxed nostalgic about Nolan and Jon himself.

What was it John Huston said in CHINATOWN? Something about whores and ugly buildings, if they last long enough, finally gaining respect?

M.A.C.